Arugula Salad

About the Recipe

This is a very “individual taste” recipe. You have to find the proportions that you like. I used to buy arugula in the prepackaged bags because I am lazy and hate to have to wash and clean greens and I would use ¼ of a bag per person, for a normal sized salad, and ¼ avocado, 8 to 12 cherry tomatoes, ¼ lemon, one good sized garlic clove and about a tablespoon of walnuts; all per person. You will find the proportions that you and your family find yummy. Now I grow all my own arugula aeroponically and I don’t have to wash it and its WAY better than anything store bought!

The tomato, avocado and lemon make the salad really juicy so #1, you don’t need very much oil…just a splash and #2, it can get soggy, so make it right before you’re going to eat it.

The freshness of the ingredients really makes a difference. I like to use super juicy tomatoes; either the little organic cherry or grape ones or the smallish ones, still on the vine. (if you have Trader Joe’s near you, you know what I’m talking about.) I like them cut into quarters for maximum surface area. If you’re using the ones on the vine, of course, you’ll want to think about that size. I cut the avocados in smallish cubes and chop the walnuts…not super fine; sometimes I’ll just crush them with my hands. See what you like. Some people like to toast the nuts.

The Benefits of Arugula

Arugula, also known as rocket and rucola, is a less recognized cruciferous vegetable that provides many of the same benefits as the better-known vegetables of the same family – broccoli, kale, and Brussels sprouts. Arugula leaves are tender and bite-sized with a tangy flavor. Along with other leafy greens, arugula contains very high nitrate levels (more than 250 milligrams/100 grams).

High intakes of dietary nitrate have been shown to lower blood pressure, reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise, and enhance athletic performance. Wow! Eat more arugula! I like to put it on pizzas, sandwiches…really most dishes. It’s also great in a morning smoothie. Let me know how YOU like to use it!

Joy and Janis Make Holiday Gluten Free Pankcakes

Notes:

My sister, Janis, has perfected this recipe. It’ a perfect combination of healthful ingredient and deliciousness! It wouldn’t be a holiday morning without her making batches and batches of these for everyone! Getting all of these grains, nuts and seeds in your diet is so helpful for brain & heart health as well as managing weight. Thanks, Janis!

Joy Makes Veggie Twice Baked Potatoes

Serve immediately and enjoy! Along with Caesar Salad, this is another dish that we ALWAYS have on Christmas Eve. Potatoes and broccoli have so many health benefits that I always feel good about this dish. Keep in mind, however, that as you add the faux cheese, faux sour cream and Earth Balance, you are adding fat calories…. still better for you than the dairy alternatives but fat, nonetheless.

Arugula Salad

This is a very “individual taste” recipe. You have to find the proportions that you like. I always use the arugula I grow from my tower garden, it is by far the best I have ever had.

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Joy Makes Veggie Broth

Benefits

Vegetable broth serves as a base for many soups, stews, casseroles, etc. but it can also stand alone as a beverage. I’ve substituted it for coffee.

People are largely ignorant about vegetable broth health benefits. Some of the pronounced vegetable broth health benefits include:

Low in Calories: Veggies, by their very nature, are low in calories. Not adding any oil, assures this low-calorie property. Stress Busters:. The vitamin C content of vegetables is known to work effectively in curbing the activities of stress producing molecules. Vitamin C and other important antioxidants halts the flow of free radicals through the body. The high vitamin content of vegetables also protects the body from oxidative stress.

Weight Management: The vegetable broth aids in weight management by serving low calories with high nutrient content. When used as a base in the preparation of soups, stews, etc., it can actually boost the dish’s nutritive and flavor value, while not adding extra calories. Having broth as a snack between meals can help to curb the appetite without consuming extra calories.

Added Benefits: Many health professionals feel that all broths can enhance gut health. With anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties, the quercetin content of onions makes it an important ingredient in this stock as it decreases intestinal permeability through a ‘sealing’ effect. Garlic is anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial across body systems and has anti-candida and anti-cancer properties. By using mushrooms in your stock you get a wonderful dose of intestinal membrane-healing zinc; they also contain immune-boosting polysaccharides. All three vegetables are also naturally rich in prebiotics that promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the large intestine.

Vegan Pumpkin Risotto with Sage

This delicious recipe was adapted from a recipe from Chloe Coscarelli.

A Little about this Dish!

Okay, first of all…this is a fabulous fall dish! Now that I’ve made it, I’m going to have it as the first course of our Thanksgiving dinner. It’s really simple and the taste PLUS health benefits are fantastic!

People are a little confused about Risotto. Many confuse Arborio rice with Orzo…shaped similarly but Orzo is a wheat product and Arborio rice is a type of rice whose nature makes it super absorbent without it becoming soggy so makes it really easy to imbue with intense flavors. The other thing about risotto is that most recipes call for cream, butter and cheese…not the healthiest nor weight friendly way to make it but THIS recipe is completely vegan and the addition of pumpkin, sage, garlic and onion, really pack a super nutritional “punch”!

Arborio rice is high in protein, good carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Of course brown rice has a better nutritional profile but as an Italian choice, it sure beats pasta.

Pumpkin is super high in beta-carotene (the highest of any vegetable), which converts to vitamin A…great for eyesight & cardiovascular protection, potassium: fantastic for recovery from exercise (higher than bananas!) and vitamin K, a cancer fighter. Sage has been found to have flavonoids and polyphenols beneficial to brain health as well as anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Top this off with the anti-viral, anti-bacteria, anti-cancer properties of onion and garlic and we’ve got a winner! (a little side note about onions: the outer layers are highest in the anti-oxidant quercetin, so be careful not to “over-peel”)

Gluten Free Bagels with Dairy Free Cream Cheese & Faux Lox

Benefits

Growing up in a small town, I didn’t know what bagels and lox were but once I discovered them, I was in love! Such a great way to start a lazy weekend morning! THEN…I learned that gluten, dairy and raw fish were not so good for me…boo! This recipe gave me back this guilty pleasure without all of the downsides. With the holidays coming up, This recipe is a perfect crowd pleaser AND, is something you can prep and let your guests assemble as they stumble out of bed. Make a pot of coffee and/or a pitcher of mimosas and you will be known as the best hostess ever!

So, just a few health notes: Benefits! You know how I rave about onions and tomatoes…so many antioxidants. Lycopene is the best known antioxidant in tomatoes and is associated with reduction in the risk of many cancers, improved bone health and cardiovascular function. Tomatoes are also high in Vitamin C, biotin, molybdenum, vitamin K and many other vitamins and minerals. Onions are loaded with anti-cancer, anti-fungal and overall disease preventing nutrients. You can read more about these 2 amazing foods at www.whfoods.org. Capers are a little known power house full of vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and fiber. They are particularly beneficial for hair and skin health and are helpful for reducing rheumatism, diabetes, congestion and flatulence!

Gluten Free Bagel Vegan Cream Cheese Faux Lox

 

Dairy links to cancer: (this info is from www.drmitraray.com)

I recommend two excellent best-selling books by Prof. T. Colin Campbell, ‘the father of nutritional biochemistry ‘are The China Study and Whole. These books describe decades of research linking cancer with the consumption of casein (the predominant protein in dairy), and animal food consumption in general.

The New York Times calls the China Study “the Grand Prix of Epidemiology” –http://www.nytimes.com/1990/05/08/science/huge-study-of-diet-indicts-fat-and-meat.html. –http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/07/nutrition-advice-from-the-china-study/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0 http://nutritionstudies.org/no-whey-man-ill-pass-on-protein-powder/

Also here is a quick list of papers on the topic.

[1]. Rohrmann S, Platz EA, Kavanaugh CJ, et al. Meat and dairy consumption and subsequent risk of prostate cancer in a US cohort study. Cancer Causes Control 2007; 18: 41-50.

[2]. Mitrou PN, Albanes D, Weinstein SJ, et al. A prospective study of dietary calcium, dairy products and prostate cancer risk (Finland). Int J Cancer 2007;

[3]. Willett WC. Nutrition and cancer. Salud Publica Mex 1997; 39: 298–309.

[4]. Chan JM, Stampfer MJ, Ma J, et al. Dairy products, calcium, and prostate cancer risk in the Physicians’ Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr 2001; 74: 549-54

[5]. Tseng M, Breslow RA, Graubard BI, Ziegler RG. Dairy, calcium, and vitamin D intakes and prostate cancer risk in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Epidemiologic Follow-up Study cohort. Am J Clin Nutr 2005; 81:

[6]. Veierod MB, Laake P, Thelle DS. Dietary fat intake and risk of prostate cancer: a prospective study of 25,708 Norwegian men. Int J Cancer 1997; 73:

[7]. Grant WB. An ecologic study of dietary links to prostate cancer. Altern Med Rev 1999; 4: 162-9.

[8]. Kushi LH, Mink PJ, Folsom AR, et al. Prospective study of diet and ovarian cancer. Am J Epidemiol 1999; 149: 21-31.

[9]. Fairfield KM, Hunter DJ, Colditz GA, et al. A prospective study of dietary lactose and ovarian cancer. Int J Cancer 2004; 110: 271-7

[10]. Schwartz GG, Hulka BS. Is vitamin D deficiency a risk factor for prostate cancer? (Hypothesis). Anticancer Res 1990; 10: 1307-11.

[11]. Miller A, Stanton C, Murphy J, Devery R. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched milk fat inhibits growth and modulates CLA-responsive biomarkers in MCF-7 and SW480 human cancer cell lines. Br J Nutr 2003; 90: 877-85.